‘I Wrote 4 Books In Prison’ – Obasanjo Says Abacha Shaped His Life

Olusegun Obasanjo, a former president of Nigeria, says his incarceration by the late military dictator, Sani Abacha, shaped his life

Olusegun Obasanjo, a former president of Nigeria, says his incarceration by the late military dictator, Sani Abacha, shaped his life and made him a better leader.

He said this on Saturday, May 19, 2018, while speaking at the maiden edition of ASIS International, ASIS 206 Lagos Annual Leadership Retreat, held at the Olusegun Obasanjo Presidential Library, Abeokuta.

The event was organised by ASIS to find ways of bringing all private security outfits in the country under an umbrella. According to the former President, his prison experience enriched him and it was one of the factors which immensely contributed to his achievements as President.

He said, “My prison experience enriched me. In fact, it contributed to my performance while I was in office. A leader must learn from every situation. “Although, nobody wants to go to prison but I was in prison when I started learning and keeping myself occupied. I wrote four books while I was in prison rather than become a moron and doing nothing.

“But I was sure that the man who kept me in prison will not bring me out and I was as well sure that I will get out of prison. Honestly, the prison experience has enriched my life.”

He restated his support for a move to review the Act setting up the Nigeria Security and Civil Defence Corps, to check security threats in the country. Obasanjo’s administration in 2005 transformed the civil defence from a voluntary organisation to a para-military group. He said there was nothing wrong in seeking improvement for the NSCDC, especially in accommodating the private security professionals in the country.

However, he warned that such review should be supported by effective monitoring and control, and it would have to also go through the National Assembly.

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Katsina Govt Calls For Total Reforms In Nigeria’s Prison

file photo   The Katsina State Governor, Aminu Masari has said emphasised the need for Nigeria’s prisons to be reformed.

file photo

 

The Katsina State Governor, Aminu Masari has said emphasised the need for Nigeria’s prisons to be reformed.

The Governor made the call on Monday during a courtesy visit a study tour team of advanced command course from Prisons Academy, Ijebu-Igbo in Ogun state led by Assistant Controller General of Prisons, ACG Oluwayiopese Benson at the Government House Council Chamber, Katsina.

He asks the participants of the course to utilize every opportunity to call on the relevant authorities to change the status quo of the prisons to conform to the world best practices.

On his part, Mr Oluwayiopese commended the Governor for being the first to visit Katsina state command of the prison Service shortly after he was sworn in in 2015.

He further commended the governor for being the first chief executive to give amnesty to 35 condemned convicts whose cases did not involve loss of life emphasized the need for the governor to construct a hostel to be dedicated and engraved in his name in the Academy in Ogun state or in the alternative provide a vehicle to the Academy.

It could be recalled that the academy is structured and purposed towards training officers at the managerial levels and equip them with internationally accepted technical skills and best practices.

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She Served 23 Years For A Murder She Says She Didn’t Commit: What She’s Doing Now

Tyra Patterson spent 23 years in prison for a murder she didn’t commit. She was finally vindicated in 2017, when

prison

Tyra Patterson spent 23 years in prison for a murder she didn’t commit. She was finally vindicated in 2017, when she was released after activists and the victim’s sister fought for her release.

She could have left prison bitter and cynical, but instead Patterson is using her experience to help counsel others, especially teens.

It all started in 1994, when a then 19-year-old Patterson was hanging out with friends in Dayton Ohio. “It was the early hours of Sept. 20, 1994, when Patterson and her friend Becky Stidham were hanging out and smoking marijuana in Patterson’s apartment in Dayton, Ohio. Sometime after midnight, they went outside to look for a set of missing car keys and came across five young people whom they knew in passing. They tagged along with this crew, eventually getting in a car with three of them,” ABC News reported.

This is where the trouble started. This other group was on a mission to rob someone. And in the process, another young woman was shot and killed.

“Patterson was among five people arrested. She was charged with five counts of aggravated robbery and one count of aggravated murder. She was able to be charged with murder because when a person is killed during the commission of certain crimes–in this case, robbery–all the conspirators to the initial crime can be held responsible for that person’s death,” ABC News reported.

Patterson confessed, she later said under coercion. And at 20 years old, she was found guilty on one count of aggravated murder and four counts of aggravated robbery. The sentence: 43 years to life in prison. The woman who actually fired the shot that murdered Michelle Lai made a plea deal and was sentenced to a lighter sentence than Patterson–30 years to life.

During her time in prison, Patterson learned to read, earned her GED, and became a paralegal. She also began to mentor high school students from behind bars. Then, after 17 years in prison, she missed David Singleton of the Ohio Justice and Policy Center. Singleton took up Patterson’s cause and raised awareness about her situation with the goal of freeing Patterson.

Celebrities even started to take note and documentary filmmaker Ken Burns “posted a Facebook video in 2016 while holding a sign that says ‘I am Tyra Patterson,’” Dayton Daily News reported.

Even the victim’s sister now came to her defense. Holly Lai Holbrook wrote a letter to Ohio Gov. John Kasich in 2016 to express her concern. “I no longer believe that Tyra participated in the robbery that led to Michelle’s murder. I believe it is wrong for Tyra to stay locked up.”

Patterson was finally granted parole and on Christmas Day 2017, she walked out of prison free.

“I felt vindicated. I kissed the ground and gave thanks,” she said.

Now 42 years old, she’s starting over, trying to regain all of those lost years with her family.

Today, Patterson is working as a paralegal and community outreach director for the same organization that worked for her freedom.

 

 

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Meek Mill Speaks From Prison, ‘I Was Setup’

Meek Mill is speaking from the prison where he’s serving his controversial sentence and insists the judicial system set him

Meek Mill is speaking from the prison where he's serving his controversial sentence and insists the judicial system set him up to fail... from jump street.

Meek talked by phone to Lester Holt of NBC Nightly News about the 2-4 years Judge Genece Brinkley gave him, and he says the real problem started way back in 2008 when he was convicted on gun and drug charges.

Meek feels the 10 years probation he got way back then made it nearly impossible for him to avoid getting tossed in prison. As he puts it, a simple jaywalking ticket would've been enough for Brinkley to lock him up ... under the law.

The Philly rapper's case is drawing national attention now and he's getting tons of high-profile support  as critics question Judge Brinkley's sentence. Despite the pressure, she's refused to recuse herself or grant Meek a bail hearing.

Jamal Truelove Framed By Police, Awarded $10M After 6 Years In Prison For Murder He Didn’t Commit

After spending six years in prison for a murder he didn’t commit, a San Francisco man has been awarded $10

murder

After spending six years in prison for a murder he didn’t commit, a San Francisco man has been awarded $10 million when a judge ruled that he was framed by the police.

Jamal Trulove’s wrongful conviction for the murder of his friend in 2007 was thrown out by an eight-member jury in Oakland, California. The jury heard three weeks of testimony and deliberated for two days before unanimously finding that the two lead homicide inspectors on the case — Michael Johnson and Maureen D’Amico — had violated Trulove’s rights by fabricating evidence against him and withholding evidence that might have helped him, SFGate reported.

Trulove had accused four San Francisco police officers of framing him for the murder which took place at the city’s Sunnydale public housing complex. Initially, Trulove was convicted in 2010. But was acquitted after a 2015 retrial. He pursued a federal civil rights lawsuit against the city and county of San Francisco following his release.

All four officers Trulove accused are retired, and while two of them were found to have framed him, jurors found no wrongdoing by a third inspector, Robert McMillan, or by Officer John Evans, the crime-scene investigator. The city is responsible to pay the $10 million in damages.

Trulove, 33, was sentenced to 50 years to life in prison for the killing of a 28-year-old friend, Seu Kuka. Kuka was shot in the back on a San Francisco street on July 23, 2007. He also had several shots in the head. At the time, just one witness, then 24-year-old Priscilla Lualemaga, identified Trulove. She was the prosecution’s sole witness against Trulove, then 25. Lualemaga testified that she saw Trulove and Kuka argue and that Trulove chased him down and shot him.

“Her first identification was tentative, but she affirmed it after seeing Trulove three months later as a guest on the reality TV show ‘I Love New York 2,’“ SF Gate reported.

A state appeals court overturned Trulove’s conviction in 2014, after discovering the prosecutor had made an “unfounded claim to the jury.” The prosecutor told jurors that the neighbor had been threatened and risked her life by coming forward. Trulove got a second trial in 2015 and was acquitted.

The basis of his suit for damages was that police coerced the witness to identify him. U.S. District Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers found this to be true. Gonzalez Rogers ruled that Inspector D’Amico “showed the witness a single photo of Trulove rather than the usual police practice of presenting photos of different people and asking the witness to identify the perpetrator,” Newsweek reported.

Gonzalez Rogers added that Johnson showed the same witness a suggestive photo array consisting of Trulove and other men the witness had already disregarded as being the shooter.

Gonzalez Rogers also said that despite having evidence that there was another possible suspect, the police never investigated. During the hearing, Truelove told the judge and jury about his life in prison, saying that he felt “fear from the time you get up,” and daily humiliation.

Trulove, who works at an after-school program for at-risk children in San Francisco, broke down in tears when he heard about the $10 million damages award.

“When we won the acquittal for Jamal for a crime that he didn’t commit, that wasn’t really justice, that was what should have happened,” said Trulove’s attorney, Alex Reisman, in KQED radio interview. “But when he won this verdict, I think he feels that at least some measure of justice was done for him.”

Jamal Truelove
Jamal Trulove. Photo: VH1

https://twitter.com/sfchronicle/status/982460761040711680/photo/1

 

 

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From Palace To Prison: Brazil’s Ex-President Lula In Dates

Brazilian ex-president (2003-2011) Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva (L) speaks next to Brazilian former president (2011-2016) Dilma Rousseff during a

Brazilian ex-president (2003-2011) Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva (L) speaks next to Brazilian former president (2011-2016) Dilma Rousseff during a Catholic mass in memory of Lula’s late wife Marisa Leticia, at the metalworkers’ union building in Sao Bernardo do Campo, in metropolitan Sao Paulo, Brazil. NELSON ALMEIDA / AFPNELSON ALMEIDA / AFP

 

Brazil’s ex-president, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, better known as Lula, was on Sunday serving his first full day behind bars after receiving a 12-year prison sentence for corruption. 

The 72-year-old arrived at the jail in the southern city of Curitiba late Saturday after days of political drama that gripped Brazil, becoming the country’s first former leader to end up behind bars.

Here is a list of key dates in the life of one of the world’s most popular politicians.

– October 27, 1945: Lula is born to a poor farming family in Brazil’s northeast. His family moves when he is seven to the state of Sao Paulo to escape hunger.

– 1975: He becomes president of the metal workers’ union, having worked in that sector since the age of 14.

– 1978-80: At the height of the military dictatorship, Lula leads major strikes in the industrial suburbs and is jailed for a month for his role.

– 1980: Lula co-founds the leftist Workers’ Party (PT) and goes on to take part in the creation, in 1983, of the Unified Workers’ Central (CUT), which becomes Brazil’s largest trade union federation.

– 1986: He is elected to Congress.

 First leftist President

– 2003: Lula becomes Brazil’s first leftist president after winning the election in the previous year. He is re-elected in 2006 for a term ending in 2010.

– 2016: The Supreme Court blocks his appointment as chief of staff to President Dilma Rousseff, his handpicked successor. She is then impeached in August after allegations of financial wrongdoing.

– July 2017: Lula is found guilty of receiving a bribe from a Brazilian construction company in return for contracts with state oil giant Petrobras. He is sentenced to nine and a half years behind bars.

– January 2018: He loses an appeal and his sentence is increased to 12 years and one month.

– April 5, 2018: After losing an appeal to delay the start of his sentence, Lula is ordered to turn himself in within 24 hours. He defies the order but later agrees to comply.

– April 7, 2018: Shortly before midnight, Lula becomes an inmate at the federal police headquarters in Curitiba.

AFP

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School teacher remanded in prison for defiling 7-year-old pupil

A Kasuwan Mama Upper Area court on Thursday ordered that a 23-year-old teacher, Moses Danladi, be remanded in prison for

A Kasuwan Mama Upper Area court on Thursday ordered that a 23-year-old teacher, Moses Danladi, be remanded in prison for allegedly defiling a 7-year-old pupil.

The police prosecutor, Mr E.A Inegbenoise, told the court that the victim’s uncle, one Cpl. Zakka Peter of III Division, Maxwell Khobe Cantonement, reported the matter at the Bassa police station on March 15.

Inegbenoise said that the complainant told the police that the victim told him that her teacher molested her.

The offense, according to the prosecutor, contravened Section 285 of the Penal Code

The accused, however, pleaded not guilty of the charge.

The Magistrate H. Lawal gave the order for Danladi of Kisaghyip Federal Low Cost, Bassa Local Government Area of Plateau state be remanded in prison after he was arraigned on one count charge of act of gross indecency.

Lawal then adjourned fixed May 9 for hearing of the matter.

Rapper DMX Sentenced to One Year in Prison for Tax Fraud

American Rapper DMX has been sentenced to one year in prison for tax fraud on Wednesday, 27th of March. According

American Rapper DMX has been sentenced to one year in prison for tax fraud on Wednesday, 27th of March.

According to Billboard, Federal Judge Jed Rakoff played the song “Slippin” in court at the rapper’s request.

DMX who plead guilty last year for tax-evasion charges had engaged in a multi-year scheme to avoid paying $1.7 million in taxes, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office of the Southern District of New York.

The scheme included mostly using cash for all transactions and avoiding using a bank account in his name, even as he toured and sold records.

In court, the 47-year-old admitted to breaking the law saying, “I wasn’t following the rules, I was in a cloud.”

The judge said that in the court’s view DMX “is a good man. In many ways, he’s his own worst enemy.”

Photo Credit: John Lamparski/Getty Images

Cultists in Bayelsa to spend 20 years in prison

Governor Henry Seriake Dickson has signed the Secret Cult, Societies and Similar Activities Prohibition Amendment Law 2018. The new law

Governor Henry Seriake Dickson has signed the Secret Cult, Societies and Similar Activities Prohibition Amendment Law 2018.

The new law makes it mandatory for offenders to be jailed upon conviction, for not less than 20 years, without any option of fine.

Dickson noted with serious concern, the rise in cult and other related activities in the state, especially in Yenagoa and its environs, stressing that, with the amendment, law enforcement agencies have been empowered to deal decisively with suspected cultists and their sponsors.

He explained that the amendment to the law, which had existed since May, 2012, was necessitated by the urgent need to check the rise in cult activities among youths.

He said the amendment was necessary to give the law enforcement agencies more powers to proactively protect lives and property as well as safeguard the future of the state.

The law also empowers the Police and other law enforcement agencies to conduct search on the homes of suspected cultists and sponsors, even without warrant, while buildings and premises used for cult, activities, initiations as well as the storage of arms and dangerous weapons will be forfeited to the Government.

The law equally empowers the State Government to destroy such buildings and premises, without any compensation to its owners.

Chief Press Secretary to the Governor, Francis Agbo, said the law, among other provisions stipulates that, the Police can arrest any person it suspects of involvement in cult and other related activities, without a warrant, conduct stop and search on motor vehicles, tricycle, boat or any place suspected to be used for cult and its related activities.

It also allows for the arrest of the occupier of the house or where cult activities are suspected to have taken place or about to be held.

He said: “As a government we cannot allow this ugly trend of events to continue unabated.

“A situation where children below 15, 16, 17 and majority of our youth population are members of one dangerous cult group or society, where they carry guns and other dangerous weapons and shoot, maim, kill and create insecurity in parts of the State is totally unacceptable.

“As a responsible government, we must put an end to this and it has to be now.”

Military Court Sentences Policeman To Life In Prison For Killing Protester

  A military court in the Democratic Republic of Congo has jailed a police officer for life for killing a

 

A military court in the Democratic Republic of Congo has jailed a police officer for life for killing a demonstrator opposed to President Joseph Kabila, a judicial source said Tuesday.

“Police officer Agbe Obeid is sentenced to life in prison for having shot Eric Boloko at point-blank range with live ammunition on Sunday, February 25,” in Mbandaka, a registry official at the military tribunal in the northwestern city told AFP.

“This trigger-happy policeman shot the young man as he was peacefully going home (after a demonstration). I hope that he will really serve out his sentence,” said Fabien Mongunza, president of the civil society movement in Equateur province, of which Mbandaka is the capital.

“This verdict has calmed people’s minds because the tension was noticeable. Military justice has done well to swiftly convict this policeman,” Mongunza added.

Boloko was one of two people reported killed by security forces during weekend marches in Congolese cities banned by Kabila’s regime but supported by the influential Roman Catholic church.

The protests were prompted by Kabila’s failure to quit power when his second elected five-year mandate expired in December 2016 and by delays in holding elections, now scheduled for the end of 2018.

‘Stop these shameful practices’

Marches in Mbandaka on December 31 and January 21, called by a group of intellectuals close to the church, took place with no serious incidents, several witnesses said.

A policeman who shot prominent activist Rossy Mukendi of the Collective 2016 citizen’s movement in the capital Kinshasa on Sunday has been arrested, according to police spokesman Colonel Pierrot-Rombaut Mwanamputu.

Mukendi died of his wounds, prompting one lobby group, the Congolese Association for Access to Justice, to speak of a premeditated “assassination”.

The chairman of the African Union Commission, Moussa Faki Mahamat, on Tuesday lamented the deaths at the protests, calling on Congolese authorities to “shed light on the events” of Sunday.

He asked “Congolese political actors to show more responsibility and defence and security forces to exhibit the greatest restraint”.

Also on Tuesday, local press watchdog Journalists in Danger denounced the government’s decision to cut internet across the country for 10 hours on Sunday.

“Stop these shameful practices, which seriously harm freedom of information and further tarnish the image” of the country, the watchdog said in a statement.

Anti-Kabila protests on New Year’s Eve and on January 21 had left 15 people dead at the hands of the security forces, according to tolls given by organisers and the United Nations.

The government said that just two people died.

Protest organisations have said there will be no let-up until Kabila declares publicly that he will step down after the presidential poll planned for December 23.

AFP

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